I am not weird. Call me eccentric.

ancientpeoples:

Limestone column capital of the god Bes
39.5cm high and 52cm wide (15 9/16 x 20 1/2 inch.) 
Egyptian, Ptolemaic Period, 332 - 30 BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum
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ancientpeoples:

Limestone column capital of the god Bes

39.5cm high and 52cm wide (15 9/16 x 20 1/2 inch.) 

Egyptian, Ptolemaic Period, 332 - 30 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

kageboonshin:

best part of 2013 image

worst part of 2013image

(via ruinedchildhood)


Tales from Earthsea2006 Japanese theatrical poster
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Tales from Earthsea
2006 Japanese theatrical poster

(Source: oh-totoro, via all-studioghibli)

astolat:

theirtinywings:

samjohnssonvt:

gryphonrhi:

thezhenger:

chris control your goddamn face you have just gone through an extremely painful super-serum transformation you did not just have the diddly doo orgasm

…actually, at this point, Steve’s just now experiencing the sudden absence of both recent extreme pain and long-term low level pain.  He’s probably so high on endorphins that the expression is completely accurate.

Also, he was asthmatic. This is the first time in twenty years that his lungs work. Ever had an oxygen high?

Might not be an O-face folks, but homeboys high as a kite.

*reblogs to save deeply inspirational commentary*

(via franciu-is-croatoan-free)

studiioghibli:

Ponyo » Sosuke saving Ponyo

(via all-studioghibli)

ancientart:

Howling Dog Effigy, Jalisco, 300 BC-AD 200. 
Why were dogs so significant to the Mexica?
Dogs were associated with the god of death, Xolotl, among the Mexicas of the highlands of Mexico. Both a dog and Xolotl were thought to lead the soul to the underworld. The skinny body and white hue of the shown dog represented above may have underworld connotations, connecting it to this belief. Xolotl was also associated by the Mexica with the planet Venus as the evening star, and was portrayed with a canine head.

The dog’s special relationship with humans is highlighted by a number of Colima dog effigies wearing humanoid masks. This curious effigy type has been interpreted as a shamanic transformation image or as a reference to the modern Huichol myth of the origin of the first wife, who was transformed from a dog into a human. However, recent scholarship suggests a new explanation of these sculptures as the depiction of the animal’s tonalli, its inner essence, which is made manifest by being given human form via the mask.
The use of the human face to make reference to an object’s or animal’s inner spirit is found in the artworks of many ancient cultures of the Americas, from the Inuit of Alaska and northern Canada to peoples in Argentina and Chile. (Walters)

On the subject of the significance of dogs, and dog effigies wearing humanoid masks, check out this post from a while back of ‘examples of dogs represented in ancient Mexican art.’ The final artefact here is from Colima, and shows a dog wearing a human mask.
Courtesy of & currently located at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA, via their online collections, 2009.20.148.
View high resolution

ancientart:

Howling Dog Effigy, Jalisco, 300 BC-AD 200. 

Why were dogs so significant to the Mexica?

Dogs were associated with the god of death, Xolotl, among the Mexicas of the highlands of Mexico. Both a dog and Xolotl were thought to lead the soul to the underworld. The skinny body and white hue of the shown dog represented above may have underworld connotations, connecting it to this belief. Xolotl was also associated by the Mexica with the planet Venus as the evening star, and was portrayed with a canine head.

The dog’s special relationship with humans is highlighted by a number of Colima dog effigies wearing humanoid masks. This curious effigy type has been interpreted as a shamanic transformation image or as a reference to the modern Huichol myth of the origin of the first wife, who was transformed from a dog into a human. However, recent scholarship suggests a new explanation of these sculptures as the depiction of the animal’s tonalli, its inner essence, which is made manifest by being given human form via the mask.

The use of the human face to make reference to an object’s or animal’s inner spirit is found in the artworks of many ancient cultures of the Americas, from the Inuit of Alaska and northern Canada to peoples in Argentina and Chile. (Walters)

On the subject of the significance of dogs, and dog effigies wearing humanoid masks, check out this post from a while back of ‘examples of dogs represented in ancient Mexican art.’ The final artefact here is from Colima, and shows a dog wearing a human mask.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA, via their online collections2009.20.148.

fashionsfromhistory:

Child’s Dress
Early 19th Century 
United States
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fashionsfromhistory:

Child’s Dress

Early 19th Century 

United States

(via fashionsfromhistory)

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